Frequently Asked Questions

Texting to improve your marriageHow do I know if counseling/therapy will help me?

How long are therapy sessions?

How long does therapy last?

What is the cost of therapy?

What are the office hours?

What if I think I need medication?

Does my spouse need to come to therapy if I am having marriage problems?

How do I get started?

Do I have to tell the therapist “everything”?

My child has behavior problems; will counseling with my child help?

How do I know if counseling/therapy will help me?

Obviously, every person is different.  If a person finds that they tend to run into some of the same problems in life repeatedly, it might be a clue and good idea to maybe talk with someone about these patterns.  Sometimes it is helpful to just talk to someone that is not as emotionally involved and can be an “outsider looking in”.  Also, being able to gauge how severe a problem is helps to determine if you might need therapy.  Certainly if a person is having suicidal thoughts or is self-harming, that person should seek professional help.

How long are therapy sessions?

Therapy sessions are generally 50 minutes long.  How often a person meets with the therapist is usually determined by individual need. Unless a person is experiencing a major crisis in life, most sessions are held 2 to 3 times a month.

How long does therapy last?

The length of therapy depends on treatment goals and what a person’s desired outcomes might be.  In general though, most people are able to work through problems over a course of about 6 months to a year depending on the severity of the issues.  And with less severe issues, some people get what they need from therapy after just a few sessions.

What is the cost of therapy?

The cost of therapy sessions is generally $125.00 per session.  However, the out-of-pocket expense depends on an individual’s financial situation.  In cases where a person or a family has a limited income, we do have a sliding scale fee schedule available that is based on family income. 

All of our therapists are happy to provide you with the forms you will need to file with your insurance company for possible reimbursement of your out-of-pocket expense. Some of our therapists are in-network with various insurance panels and able to accept insurance for those panels. If your therapist is an in-network provider for your insurance plan, they will file claims with your insurance plan and you would be responsible for any co-pays or deductibles that would apply. If the therapist is out-of-network, you would be responsible for filing your claim with those insurance companies and seeking reimbursement. All fees are due at the end of each session.  Please note: There are no guarantees that your insurance company will reimburse for services.

Some employers provide EAP (Employee Assistance Programs) that cover 100% of the cost of therapy for a certain amount of sessions (generally 3-5 sessions). Check with your employer to see if this benefit is available for you.  If your therapist is not participating in your EAP plan, the cost of sessions is based on the sliding scale fee schedule and we can provide you with the forms needed to possibly be reimbursed by your insurance plan.

What are the office hours?

Office hours vary based on the particular therapist you see.  Some of our therapists have evening and weekend times available.  But our general hours are Monday through Thursday, 9:30 AM to 5:00 PM and on Fridays 9:30 to 1:00 PM.  Sometimes therapy, like going to the doctor, sometimes requires taking off from work.  We can provide a work or school excuse if needed.

What if I think I need medication?

Medications can only be prescribed by a licensed medical doctor or nurse practitioner. Our therapists DO NOT prescribe medication.  Usually, if you think you might need or benefit from medication, talk with your PCP (primary care physician) first.  He/She can determine what medication can be appropriate for your symptoms or if you need to be referred to a psychiatrist.

Does my spouse need to come to therapy if I am having marriage problems?

Certainly marriage therapy works best if both partners are present.  But when there is high level of conflict in the relationship or when just one person is not willing to come to therapy, there can be some benefit in talking about relationship issues individually.  Very often the therapist will meet with couples individually when it seems there are personal issues that may be better addressed that way.

How do I get started?

The first step is to contact the therapist by phone or email to schedule an appointment.  The therapist will send you the intake forms you will need to complete and bring with you to your first appointment.  After the first appointment, you will decide with the therapist future appointments and your course of treatment.

Do I have to tell the therapist “everything”?

One of the most important things to know about therapy is that everything discussed during a session is confidential.  The law requires it! Certainly being open and honest with the therapist is very important in helping a person work through issues in their lives and relationships.  It just helps the therapist in understanding you and being able to truly help you. The only time the therapist would every break confidentiality is if the therapist thinks a person might hurt themselves or someone else.  And in cases where a child has been abused, the therapist is required to report to the proper authorities.

My child has behavior problems; will counseling with my child help?

When a child is having behavior problems at home or at school, usually it is an indication that something difficult is happening in that child’s life.  Family discord, divorce, moving to a new place, parenting style, relationships with the parents, sibling influences and peer influences all can have an effect on a child’s behavior.  Having a stable and loving family will do more than any sort of therapy in helping a child with behavior problems.  Because of this fact, our approach to counseling with children will involve the whole family.  The parents are key in helping correct and change behavior problems in children.  Our approach is to work with the parents first, and then bring in the child for counseling/therapy later to teach the child new coping skills.